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Emergency 2 Print E-mail
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Written by Shigamoto   
Thursday, 13 January 2005

Although this game is not a shareware or freeware game it can still be regarded as an alternative game since it is not that well known. Emergency 2 is developed by Sixteen Tons Entertainment in Germany which means that the original game is in German but there is an English version as well.

””

In the game you are a rescue scene commander, your task is to coordinate rescue efforts after major incidents. These incidents can be anything from traffic accidents to terrorist bombings and nuclear meltdowns. You decide the units that are required on each scene, ambulances, firefighters, police, K-9 units, helicopters and so on.

Since the game is German all the rescue units is in German color schemes, which isn’t that, international to be honest. It’s not an important detail in what color the rescue vehicles are in but still it would be nice if they could be changed.

On each accident scene there is usually a number of injured people. These people have to be rushed to hospital using paramedics. This part is really detailed, no matter what you do in the game you have to order every paramedic to exit the vehicle, go to the victim, provide treatment, get them on the stretcher, walk back to the ambulance and then away.

Very detailed indeed, however at really large accident scenes this is silly and far too times consuming. Imagine a train accident with a number of injured people and you have called twelve ambulances, having to click each ambulance individually is a great challenge. This goes for all the other units in the game as well.

Some missions include providing security against terrorists, these missions are usually very unpredictable. You can call SWAT teams to the scenes and snipers. However if the police are shot at they don’t return fire, you have to order them to return fire, to be honest quite stupid.

The missions are at times very hard to get a grip on. For example the developers expect the player to know what to do, that he has to turn off something that is a small blip on the map that could just have been a detail. There are no real clear directions.

A nice thing with the game is the environment; all of them are German cities and outdoor nature. They are very detailed, especially the cities were people are walking around carrying out their daily routines, there are traffic and stores, and the cities are perfect.

It is clear that there have been problems with the translation of the game from German to English. The English expressions are old at times and sometimes they have forgotten to translate the radio communications between you and your people on the ground, so all the sudden someone starts reporting in German.

I think the idea of this game is good, saving lives. There are far to many games were you kill and it’s always nice with some new fresh ideas. Unfortunately Emergency 2 is a bit too detailed to make it a great game, there is simply too much stuff you have to do on your own, this causes you to often loose missions just because of poor design.

”” ”” ””


Developer: Sixteen Tons Entertainment
Website for game: N/A
Publisher: Take 2 Interactive
O/S: Win 98/ME/2000/XP
Cost of Full Game: About $19
Year of Release:

Requirements:
Pentium III 600 MHz, 128 MB RAM, 16 MB video memory and Direct X 8.0 or later
Tested on:
Pentium 4 2,4 GHz, 256 MB RAM, 128 MB video memory

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