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Beyond Divinity Print E-mail
User Rating: / 3
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Written by Shigamoto   
Sunday, 23 October 2005
Ever since Baldur’s Gate was released we have been longing for the next great Role-Playing game. Is Beyond Divinity it? Read on to find out.

Beyond Divinity is actually a sequel to Divine Divinity (released in 2002). However Beyond Divinity is standalone so players who haven’t played the original game should not fear. The game was released in 2004 and when bought you got a free novella by Rhianna Pratchett. Actually promotions like this are becoming more rare, so it’s a good undertaking by the publisher.

The game starts with you being freed from a dungeon by an evil Death Knight. You and the Death Knight are unfortunately soul-forged, if you can’t undo the curse that is. Finally a story that isn’t based on a war taking place.

In Beyond Divinity you will control a number of characters as your party gains members. Controlling the game isn’t that hard, it’s a matter of just clicking and moving things with the mouse. However you constantly have to move the mouse to the upper right corner of the screen to do things. Often it takes some time to do this and it can be frustrating in tense situations.

The first twenty minutes are actually the most boring in the game. You are presented with a linear part with only one way to go, one thing to do and so on. It’s a danger for developers not caring about that first part of the game since many gamers might stop playing entirely. Anyways after surviving the first part it really takes off and you notice why so many people likes this game.

The environments are beautiful, no doubt about it. But they are nothing special compared to other RPGs. What I like about them though is that there is lots of stuff you can do in them. There are over 300 sub-quests in the game, while many of them are simple there are a couple of challenging missions.

All the dialogs in the game are spoken, it’s nothing really new since we have already seen it in games like Silver. Rhianna Pratchett has written the dialogs, but honestly I would have not known the difference. They are pretty basic and predictable.

Fighting in Beyond Divinity is not as good as in the Diablo-series. First of all the enemies are pretty stupid, they just walk straight at you and strike with their swords, no tactics at all. It’s also hard for the player to use any significant tactics since the battle becomes so close and rapid. I would have preferred either more action oriented fighting or old school battles (ala Final Fantasy).

The musical score deserves some mentioning. It’s very beautiful and adds a lot to the game play. They should press it on cds and sell for a reasonable amount. Kirill Pokrovsky, who has one a couple of awards, composes the music.

Overall Beyond Divinity does appeal to me. However you have to live through the first part of the game. The controls also bring the score down a bit since they are really frustrating at times.

If you like RPGs you should try this game, it might be too slow in the beginning for players who generally play strategy or action games though.



Related: Ultima VI, Silver, Fallout
Developer: Larian Studios
Website for Game: http://www.beyond-divinity.com/
Publisher: Digital Jesters
O/S: Windows 98/ME/2000/XP
Cost of Full Game: $19.99 Click Here To Buy!
Year of Release: 2004

Requirements:
Pentium III 800 MHz, 256 MB RAM,
Tested on:
Pentium 4 2.4 GHz, 512 MB RAM, ATI Radeon Graphics Card





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